Understanding the Arctic weather with better computer models

By Máté Mile, ph.d. student, University of Oslo and MET Norway

I believe that it is particularly important to study the Arctic weather and climate in order to better understand and respond to rapid changes in this region. It is our responsibility to gain knowledge and protect this environment for future generations.

The meteorological satellites known as Metop orbit the Earth from pole to pole, at a little over 800 kilometers height. Image: ESA.

The meteorological satellites known as Metop orbit the Earth from pole to pole, at a little over 800 kilometers height. Image: ESA.

I have been interested in the use of atmospheric observations in numerical weather prediction for a long time. The Arctic region is very special in that sense. The observations of temperature, wind, humidity and so on, that are collected in these high latitudes, mostly come from satellites that orbit the Earth. Data collected from these satellites provide information for better Arctic weather forecasts.

Nowadays, the main challenge in this area is to increase the number of observations that are incorporated into our analyses in the numerical weather prediction models

Máté Mile, ph.d. student, University of Oslo and MET Norway Photo: Anna Kathinka Dalland Evans

Máté Mile, ph.d. student, University of Oslo and MET Norway
Photo: Anna Kathinka Dalland Evans

I'm working at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute (MET Norway) and I'm doing my ph.d. at the University of Oslo. In the Alertness project, the collaboration between the different research institutions is important in order to foster developments of Arctic weather forecasts. I have spent half a year on a scientific visit to the Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute in De Bilt in the Netherlands in order to work with satellite experts on the use of satellite wind measurements. This was the first phase of my ph.d. work.

During the second stage, I'm going to extend the work from the first phase to other satellite products focusing on near-surface measurements over sea ice conditions. The last phase will be about examining the importance of improved atmospheric description. In technical terms, I will be working on forcing in a coupled ocean-sea ice system.